Sermon Illustration Library

A Voice from Nowhere

Illustration Information
Title
A Voice from Nowhere
Author
H. M. S. Richards
Reference
Signs of the Times, July 13, 1943; Via March 2006 Signs of the Times E-mail Newsletter
Submitted By
Scott Severance
Submitted On
March 1, 2006
Last Modified
March 2, 2006
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It is said that when Charles Spurgeon was asked to speak at the opening of the Crystal Palace, London, he went over a few days before to test the acoustic properties of the great building. He sent one of his deacons to the farthest recess of the gallery. They thought they were the only persons in the building. Then slowly and distinctly Spurgeon repeated the scripture:

"This is a faithful saying, and worthy of all acceptation, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners; of whom I am chief." 1 Timothy 1:15.

No other word was spoken, for the deacon had signaled that he had heard distinctly, and they both hurried away, as they were busy men.

Twenty years passed by, and Mr. Spurgeon received a call to visit a dying man. He dropped his work and hastened to the man's address with the idea in mind that some poor soul was seeking salvation.

But when he got there he was surprised to find a radiant Christian, happy and rejoicing in the Lord. He told the great preacher that he did not want to die without telling him how he had been converted. "Twenty years ago," he said, "I was up in the cupola of the Crystal Palace, finishing a little glazing. Everything else had been completed, and all the other workmen had gone. Suddenly I heard a voice saying, 'This is a faithful saying, and worthy of all acceptation, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners; of whom I am chief.'

"I dropped my tools and looked up to heaven, and answered, Yes, 'Lord, I believe; help Thou mine unbelief.' (Mark 9:24) Certainly it was the voice of God. No other word was spoken. It was then and there that I gave my life to Him."

No Christian can doubt that God did speak that day to the sinner away up in the lonely cupola--He spoke by the lips of Mr. Spurgeon and pointed a needy soul in this dramatic and unusual way to the Lamb of God who came into the world to save sinners.